Vision statement for Ecological Applications @ESAApplications journal and ideas for @ESA_org

Philosophy. Know better, do better.

Applied science has an obligation to engender social good. These pathways can include knowledge mobilization, mode-2 scientific production, transparency, addressing the reproducibility crisis in science, promoting diversity and equity through representation, and enabling discovery through both theory and application of ecological principles. Evidence-based decision making can leverage the work published in Ecological Applications. However, evidence-informed decision making that uses ecological principles and preliminary evidence as a means to springboard ideas and more rapidly respond to global challenges are also needed. Science is not static, and the frame-rate of changes and challenges is exceptionally rapid. We cannot always (ever) afford to wait for sufficient, deep evidence, and in ecological applications, we need to share what clearly works, what can work, and finally also what did not work. This is a novel paradigm for publishing in a traditional journal. We are positioned with innovations in ecology such as more affordable sensor technology, R, citizen science, novel big data streams from the Earth Sciences, and team science to provide insight-level data and update data and findings over time. An applied journal need not become full open access or all open science practice based (although we must strive for these ideals), but instead provide at least some capacity within the journal to interact with policy, decision processes, and dialogue to promote the work published and to advance societal knowledge.

Proposed goals: content

  1. Leverage the ‘communications’ category of publications to hone insights in the field and advance insights that are currently data limited.
  2. Invite stakeholders and policy practioners to more significantly contribute to communications reacting and responding to evidence and highlighting evidence (similar to the ‘letters to the editor’) from a constructive and needs-based perspective.
  3. Provide the capacity for authors of article publications to update contributions with a new category of paper entitled ‘application updates’.
  4. Look to other applied science journals such as Cell for insights. This journal for instance includes reviews, perspectives, and primers as contributions. It also has a strong thematic and special issue focus to organize content.
  5. In addition to an Abstract, further develop the public text box model to describe highlights, challenges, and next steps for every article.
  6. Expand the breadth of the ‘open research’ section of contributions to include code, workflows, field methods, photographs, or any other research product that enables reproducibility.
  7. Explore a mechanism to share applications that were unsuccessful or emerging but not soundly confirmed.
  8. Explore a new ‘short synthesis’ contribution format that examines aggregated evidence. This can include short-format reviews, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, evidence maps, description of new evidence sets that support ecological applications or policy, and descriptions of compiled qualitative evidence for a contempoary challenge.

Proposed goals: process

  1. Accelerate handling time (currently, peer-review process suggests three weeks for referees). Reduce editor review time to 2 weeks and referee turnaround time to 2 weeks.
  2. Remove formatting requirements for initial submission.
  3. Remove cover letter requirement. Instead, include a short form in ScholarOne submission system that provides three brief fields to propose implications wherein the authors propose why a specific contribution is a good fit for this journal.
  4. Allow submission of a single review solicited by the authors. This review must be signed and does not count toward journal review process but can be a brilliant mechanism to inform editor-level review.
  5. Data must be made available at the time of submission. This can be a private link to data or published in a repository with limited access until acceptance. It is so useful to be able to ‘see’ data, literally, in table format to understand how and what was interpreted and presented.
  6. Consider double-blind review.
  7. Develop more anchors or hooks in papers that can reused and leveraged for policy. This can include specific reporting requirements such as plot/high-level sample sizes (N), total sample sizes of subjects (n), clear reporting of variance, and where possible, an effect size metric even as simple as the net percent change of the primary intervention or application.
  8. The current offerings are designated by contribution type such as article, letter, etc. However, once viewing a paper, the reader must best-guess based on title, abstract, and keywords how this paper contributes to application. A system of simple badges that visually signals to readers and those these seek to reuse content what a paper addresses. These badges can be placed above the title alongside the access and licensing designation badges. Categories of badges can include an icon for biome/ecosystem, methods, R or code used, immediately actionable, mode-2 collaboration, and theory.
  9. Expand SME board further. Consider accept without review as mechanism to fast track contributions that are critical and the most relevant. This would include an editor-only exceptionally rapid review process.
  10. Engage with ESA, other journals, and community to develop and offer more needs-driven special issues.
Landscapes are changing and people are always part of the picture.
Science is an important way of knowing and interacting with natural systems.
Not everything needs fixing.