Sharing strategies for #ESA2016 #openscience #scicomm

Meetings are an excellent opportunity to not only communicate your science but secure feedback. I propose the more you give, the more get.

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There are at least the following five open-science products associated with any contribution (presentation or poster) to share with your colleagues and a much wider online audience prior to the meeting.  [ green text = hyperlinks ]

Open-science products to share for a meeting

  1. The slide deck or poster can be published on SlideShare.
  2. Your data-science workflow, code, and EDA can be published as an r-markdown on GitHub.
  3. The primary or derived summary data (if you are not ready to go public yet) can be published on figshare (and/or included in GitHub repo).
  4. Most journals accept submissions that have been pre-printed. Consider sharing your draft paper on PeerJ or bioRxiv. Not at that stage? Do a blog post instead.
  5. Record a video abstract to share the main finding of your talk and post to YouTube or Vimeo. This could attract a larger audience to the conference presentation and does an incredibly useful service in communicating science to the public and others that do not attend the conference.

calm

I enjoy the process of science way too much, and I am easily distracted.  How did I do in preparing for my ESA talk this year on microenvironmental change under desert shrubs?  I scored a total of 4 our of 5 . Feel free to click on bolded text below to see materials and provide feedback. Each is absolutely a work-in-progress like the experiment itself (we need at least one more year of data). However, I am hoping it is a good time to share ideas now and see if we can do better next year in the field.

Deck on SlideShare

Code on GitHub

Data on GitHub

Video abstract (went a bit crazy here and did two). Field and in office versions. Very high cheese factor in both (hard to be natural on camera).

Science is a process. Share your steps.